The Cephalopod Coffeehouse #Review: My Father Didn’t Kill Himself #YA #book

The idea is simple: on the last Friday of each month, post about the best book you’ve finished over the past month while visiting other bloggers doing the same. In this way, we’ll all have the opportunity to share our thoughts with other enthusiastic readers. Please join us below.

So, the end of April came way faster than I was prepared for. Today, I’m prepping for the RavenCon and am feeling a bit jittery. I feel bad about not putting forth my best effort with this review so let me be clear now, this is not the full and complete review. I will be more thorough at a later time and post my complete review on Goodreads and Amazon (if they let me). Since I’m pretty much a member of the author’s, Russell Nohelty, unofficial fan club, I get a lot of his content in bulk and at discounted prices. I support almost all his Kickstarters and thus, that’s how I acquire his content whether digital or print. In any case, I’ll provide a brief review of this ebook below.

Title: My Father Didn’t Kill Himself
Author: Russell Nohelty
Genre: YA, Contemporary Fiction
Pages: 305
Reading Level: Adult
Content: R (adult content and situations, mature themes, drug and alcohol use, language, sexuality)

So first, I have issues reading YA in general so that’s not a reflection of the author’s ability to tell a story. I had trouble relating to teens with I was one, so reading about them is always a little difficult for me. With that said, this is a very hard book to read. Some of the subject matter is just painful, in an emotional way, but it’s good. Sometimes you have to be uncomfortable to really experience something that sticks with you. Overall, this is a good book I’d recommend to a select few I feel would really connect with it and benefit from it.

I give this book a 4.

If you’d like to obtain a copy of this book, try this link: Amazon

Please stop by and see what others have read 😀

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

#Review: The Time Keeper #fiction #book

Goodreads

Title:  The Time Keeper

Author: Mitch Albom

Genre: Inspirational Fiction, Time Travel

Pages: 224

Reading Level: Teen, Adult

Content: PG (adult situations and content)

This book was sweet. A fan of time travel stories, this take on the legend of Father Time takes you in a direction you wouldn’t expect. This story is less about time travel and more about man’s understanding of time and how we use it to define every moment of our existence. It all begins with the first man who dares to count the hours of the day and what happens when his desire to control time costs him what he thinks he loves more than anything else.

This story is told in two parts and the second of these parts is broken down into three points of view. Don’t let me confuse you. Basically, you have the story of how it all began and then you have the story of how it all ends as told from the point of view of: Father Time, a teenage girl, and a rich old man. The story is just as complex and fascinating as it sounds. You’ll definitely walk away from this story giving much thought to how you spend the moments of your life.

I won’t pretend that many of the aspects of the girl and old man’s life weren’t a bit cliché, but it worked well for the overall narrative. I don’t think this is a story you need to spend too much time thinking about. Once everything is cleared away and the story is concluded, the meaning and message behind it all is clear.

This is not a YA read, but I’d definitely recommend it to some young readers as well as many adults. It’s a short read too.

I listened to this book and it was a bargain buy on CD (glad I still have one of those in my car).

I give this book a 4.

This review has been posted to GoodReads.

If you’d like a Kindle copy of this book, try this link: Amazon.

Get a print copy with free international shipping at this link: Book Depository.

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

The Cephalopod Coffeehouse #Review: The Dirty Parts of the Bible #fiction #book

The idea is simple: on the last Friday of each month, post about the best book you’ve finished over the past month while visiting other bloggers doing the same.  In this way, we’ll all have the opportunity to share our thoughts with other enthusiastic readers.  Please join us below.

Well, I guess it’s a good thing the New Year is fast approaching- I’m gonna need a fresh start. This is my first time posting with this hop and I’ve fallen short. I didn’t finish the book I was planning to review, so for today, I’m sharing another fairly recent read that I failed to review until recently. Next month, I’ll do better.

Title:  The Dirty Parts of the Bible
Author: Sam Torode
Genre: General Fiction
Pages: 278
Reading Level: Adult
Content: PG-13 (adult content and situations, language, sexuality)

I’ll tell you right now, the title sounds much more controversial than this book really is, but it definitely leaves you questioning some things upon reading it. What the title doesn’t imply is just how funny the story is.

Tobias is almost helpless as he sets out into the world for the first time, on a journey to find a treasure that will save his family. I know it sounds like a Grecian epic, but in its own way, it is. Tobias has been so sheltered by his strict Baptist upbringing, that the aid of a hobo name Craw is the only thing that keeps him from going astray. Together Tobias and Craw conquer Tobia’s greatest fears and help him discover who he is meant to be, all the while discovering who his father once was. And let’s face it, when I boy sees his father for the man he really is, he’s a boy no more.

This story is funny and quirky. Yes, it does have a few taboo moments for Tobias to learn from, but for the most part, it’s an honest portrayal of what happens when people stop thinking for themselves and shelter their children to the point where they can’t relate to the world. So many aspects of this story hit home to me, and while I’m sure many people will derive different meanings from this tale, for me it was reaffirming.

I guess this modern tale of adventure would be good for anyone 13 and older, considering the world we live in, but I’d check with the parents first before recommending it. I see this going over well with young men trying to find their place in the world and any adult looking for a good laugh.

I give this book a 4.

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This review has been posted to GoodReads. If you’d like to obtain a copy of this book, try this link.

Also, I completed my reading challenge this year. Check out what I read this year at Goodreads.com.

If you’re interested in sampling some new-to-you reads, check out my #BooktagBlogHop category.

Please stop by and see what others have read and Merry Christmas to all. 😀

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

More More Time by @dseaburn Excerpt & #Giveaway by @RABTBookTours #fiction #time

Maxwell Ruth, a cantankerous, old high school history teacher falls down his basement stairs and soon thereafter starts hearing “The Words” over and over again— endingtimeendingtimeendingtime. His life is changed forever.

In this story we learn about the lives, loves, and losses of Max, Hargrove and Gwen Stinson, Beth and Bob Hazelwood, and Constance Young. They are lively, funny, at times; a little bit lost or wounded, yet resilient and hopeful.  They are wrestling with life’s most challenging issues, including, abuse, loss, infidelity, aging, secrecy and what gives life meaning. And, like all of us, they would like more, more time to find the answers to life’s most important questions. The clock, though, is always ticking and time is always short.

Excerpt

In the days after Maxwell Ruth fell down his basement stairs, he begins to hear something alarming. He decides to tell his best friend, Hargrove Stinson, even though Hargrove has gone through a similar problem when his wife, Gwen, started hearing things after their daughter, Sally, died.

“But something’s wrong.” Max grimaced, his eyes wide.

“Something’s wrong? What are you talking about?”

“Not long after I fell, I started hearing things.”

“What things?” Hargrove thought of Gwen. “Did you hear that?” she’d often say, fear in her eyes. His heart skipped a beat.

“I don’t know. It’s hard to explain. I don’t want you to think I’m…”

“What are you hearing, Max?” Hargrove’s words were more clipped than he had intended.

“It’s like, these words.”

“Someone talking?”

“No, nothing like that. It’s just this repetitive…” Max’s voice trailed off.

“A repetitive what?”

“You’ve been through enough of this…”

“Look, Max, tell me what’s going on.” Hargrove’s eyes didn’t move.

Max looked out the window again.

“Words. I’m hearing words. Woke me up after I got home from the hospital. Words slung together over and over again.” Max shrugged, his jaw went slack. “They go away. They come back. I don’t know what the hell it is.”

“Words, it sounds like words?”

Hargrove’s back stiffened. The hair on his neck prickled. “Listen. I hear her,” Gwen would say. “It’s Sally, I’m sure of it. She needs me.” He scrutinized Max’s face, looking for the terror, for the cold panic so familiar to Hargrove, but it wasn’t there.

“What did your doctor say? Did you tell him you’re hearing voices?”

“Jesus Christ, I’m not hearing voices!” Max threw the marker on the floor and walked to the window again. He wiped his face with his hand. Hargrove went to him and reached for his shoulder but then withdrew his hand.

“Okay, okay, you’re not hearing voices. You’re hearing words.”

“Yes, I’m hearing words.” Max turned around to face his friend.

“What words?”

“One word is ‘ending’ and the other word is ‘time.’” Max shrugged his shoulders.

“Time ending?” said Hargrove, his voice a monotone.

“When I hear it, it’s ‘ending time.’ And they run together like they’re a single word playing on a continuous loop: endingtimeendingtimeendingtime.” Max frowned and nodded his head to one side as he said this.

“That’s it?” Max shook his head. The corner of Hargrove’s mouth twitched slightly. “What did the doctor say?”

“Well,” said Max, looking at the floor. “I didn’t exactly tell him.”

“Jesus, Max.”

“Look, that’s all I need. A doctor thinking I’ve gone off the deep end.” Max paused. “I don’t need a friend thinking I’ve gone off the deep end either.”

“Of course not.” Hargrove cleared his throat. Max put his hand on his briefcase as if he were about to leave. “But, Jesus, Max, you should have told your doctor about this. I mean, maybe something can be done. Maybe if you had a CT or an MRI, they could find the cause. It has to be something.”

“Had those. Nothing’s wrong.”

Hargrove was quiet.

“You think I’m crazy, don’t you?” said Max.

Hargrove studied Max’s face, his full cheeks and wide eyes seeming almost childlike.

Purchase Links

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Savant Books and Publications

About the Author

David B. Seaburn served a rural country parish, worked in community mental health, was an assistant professor of psychiatry and family medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center for twenty years, and also directed a free public school-based family counseling center before his retirement in 2010. He has written five novels: More More Time (2015), Chimney Bluffs (2012), Charlie No Face (2011—Finalist in General Fiction, National Indie Excellence Awards), Pumpkin Hill (2007), and Darkness is as Light (2005). He and his wife live near Rochester, NY. They have two adult daughters and two wonderful granddaughters.

Author Links

Website | Facebook | Twitter: @dseaburn | Blog

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Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

Meet Glorie Townson: a pen name or alter ego? #author #reader

Hello there dear friends, fans, geeks, and more. Today I’m making a pretty big announcement, at least it’s big in the realm of The ToiBox of Words. As many of you have figured out, most of my writing leans towards the speculative. I write quite a bit in the genres of paranormal, fantasy, and sci-fi while sprinkling in bit of romance and even faith. In keeping true to my passions and interests I’ve decided to implement the use of a pen name.

Now, obviously this pen name is not meant to be a secret, otherwise, why announce it to the world. The purpose of this pen or alter ego is three-fold. 1. It will allow me to easily distinguish my works and categorize them for fans of particular genres, freeing me to explore and try new things. 2. The use of a pen may help with getting my foot into doors I’ve never entered before because of the genres I’ve written in the past. 3. I’ve always liked the name Glorie and don’t currently have a story in mind for it, so why not get some good use out it.

So in case you missed it, Glorie Townson will be the new pen name for any works I publish in the future that do not fall in the categories of paranormal, fantasy, or sci-fi. In time I’ll create images and a complete separate online presence for Glorie, but for now, she’s simply getting a tab of her own.

The first book I intend to publish under the Glorie Townson pen will be the contemporary romance I’ve been talking about for ages and haven’t released yet, It’s Like the Full Moon. Let me stress the word “yet”, cause believe me when say, it’s coming.

This is an unofficial Author Insights post.

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords