Legacy by Stephanie Barr, interview by #thetoiboxofwords

Greetings readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors and welcome to The ToiBox of Words. I’m your host Toi Thomas, author of Eternal Curse, and today I’m sharing a special interview with author, Stephanie Barr, about her fiction book entitled, Legacy. Enjoy!

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Where did the idea for Legacy come from?

Well, that’s a long story. I’d written short stories (already in another anthology) and then five novels and had self-published four of them after my divorce. I was having a hard time getting into the mood or writing after my divorce and signed up with a short story contest. Although I didn’t win, I jumped back into short stories as I hadn’t done in years. After a couple years, I had more than thirty of them and nowhere to put them. So, I thought I’d make another anthology. I have another two stories coming out in multi-author anthologies this fall.

Wow, thirty short stories is impressive. With thirty stories in one book, how long is the book?

It is nearly 133k words, so it’s a long read. I was actually expecting a few of my beta readers to complain, but, so far, no one has.

How did the title of this book come about?

“Legacy” is a story in my anthology and involves a pair of teenage boys who survive the atomic bombing in Nagasaki, with one of the boys (Omoto) deeply in love with the other but unwilling to bring that up because he didn’t want to ruin their relationship. When the one loved dies in violence, Omoto has to decide what kind of legacy he’ll leave. I love the title and it seemed fitting for stories that reflect my thoughts, frustrations, societal issues. There are also stories with characters from my novels, my own legacy so the title seemed perfect for the collection.

I’ve seen that quite often, having a whole collection of stories listed under the title of one, but the fact this is a representation of your own legacy, makes this all the more special.

What genre is this book and why did you choose to make it so?

Most of my fiction is fantasy and/or science fiction and my short stories are the same. The short stories that expand on novels are in keeping with the original genres, almost all of my upcoming novel related stories are hard science fiction and the stories that are related to nothing could be anything. I have two that are historical/contemporary, some fantasy, and some science fiction.

Do you worry that including so many different genres will alienate fans of a particular genre?

You know, I really don’t. I’m a character writer and I think the genre is really immaterial if the characters “speak” to the reader. And I hear that a great deal from readers. “I don’t normally like fantasy but this was really good,” or even, “I didn’t get all the technical details, but I just loved Kado.” That is something cool with my science fiction. Because I’m a rocket scientist, the science is pretty sound, especially anything in space.

What would you say is the overall message or the theme of this book?

People are what matters. What you are is not as important as who you are. We all can do something to make the world better. Love is always better than hate.

That’s quite a message, and one you can never seem to have too much of. I like it.

Tell me about the experience of writing this book; how long did it take?

The first contest I wrote for started in January 2015.  The last story I added to the mix was in June 2017. There are four stories (Tarot Queen stories) which are the only ones that were written before the respective novel. The rest of the stories, the other twenty-eight, were written in the last two years along with maybe half a dozen I’ve sold or am marketing elsewhere.

So, about two years to write an impressive single author anthology. Not too shabby.

Briefly, describe some of the stories within this book.

I told you about “Legacy.” I’ve got three stories with an autistic scientist in a space station (my son is non-verbal autistic). I have a blind arcane archer with a shapeshifting cat. I have kids escaping from ruthless invaders (prequels to the Bete Novels), meet and fall in love fantasy stories (prequels to Curse of the Jenri), a young couple getting married and the bride’s eccentric grandmother (sequels to Saving Tessa), and several stories centered on a talented Tarot Queen who uses and is used by her cards. And a farcical story of a dragon, a unicorn, and a miller’s daughter.

That last one sounds like the set-up to a cheesy joke, but then you did say it was farcical. I gotta say, I’m really digg’n the diversity of this collection. Nice job.

What are some of the major themes in this book?

Some things are bigger than yourself.
Who you are is more important than what you are.
Love can come from anywhere.
Love is better and stronger than hatred.
Nobody’s infallible.
Better to try and fail than be silent.
Karma, like natural laws, has no pity.
The quick answer isn’t always the best answer.
Brains over brawn.
There’s more than you think to some people.
Sometimes there is no good answer.
Anything can be taken too far.
Women are powerful.
Appearances can be deceiving.
People are people, no matter the “species.”

Those are some pretty intense and noble themes. I get the feeling that all your writing, at some level, has a greater message to it. Were these themes on your mind when writing these stories or did they develop within the writing process?

Some of the themes come from the novels that spawned the stories. Many of the standalone stories were prompted by particular markets or contests I was going for, but they include my own personal philosophies. “Legacy” was partly inspired by George Takai and his work. Several other stories like “Nemesis” and “Nightmare Blanket” were spawned by frustration with the recent election. I’m pretty adamant about feminism. It’s the long way of saying, some stories are built on the theme and some have the theme built into the story.

What are some of the settings in this book?

I have a space station – and that was fun because I worked with folks on orbit so it’s a bit of an area of expertise (though I don’t know as much as those who lived it). I’ve got high fantasy realms (often with highly patriarchal societies), the Earth in 2058, in a galaxy far far away (had fun with space battles using real orbital mechanics), modern day San Francisco and California between WWII and today.

Whatever the anthology is about, I always enjoy the sense of travel. It’s one of the best parts of reading an anthology, but you don’t get that as much when all the stories happen in the same world. Don’t get me wrong, there are times when being engrossed in stories from the same world is just what I want, but most of the time, I prefer setting diversity.

Who are some of your favorite characters in this book?

Who don’t I love? Characters are my favorite. Okay, I love Saldomar, Tander, Riko, Cristo, Denra, and Klevaron (Curse of the Jenri), Dylan, Nathan, Tessa, and Dotty (Saving Tessa), Dante da Silva, Scruffy, and Gus (Tarot Queen), Xander, Alya, K’Ti, and Laren (the Bete Novels), Bryder and Nayna, Kado—love me some Kado, the Devil, the dragon, Billy, Ryuuji and Omoto.

I love some of the names your characters have. I like that some are average sounding while others are more exotic.

Are there elements of your personality or life experiences in this book?

Oh, yeah. Most of my characters have a bit of me, but some have more than their fair share like Nayna and Dylan who are both very very smart and socially awkward. But the snark that makes my charming characters is mine, too (don’t ask me how both can be true; I can’t explain it) so that’s Dante da Silva, the Devil, Tander, Bryder. Kado, as I mentioned, is patterned on my son though he’s not really non-verbal, more ultra-terse and more ruthless than my son. I’m also a manga otaku who loves yaoi so Legacy is my sort of tribute.

I find that most writers can’t seem to keep themselves out of their stories, I know I can’t, but I like how you swing that a bit to pay tribute to people and influences that you care about the most.

What is one thing from this book you wish was real or could happen to you?

True love. Though inventing something that made me rich and famous would be cool, too.

One thing I’ve learned from reading so much is that true love isn’t always romantic love, (says the girl who married her best friend and can’t get enough of the Princess Bride). I too think I’d like to have something that could make me rich (don’t need the fame).

What is something you wish wasn’t real and hope doesn’t happen to you?

I wish people who were different or smart weren’t judged, bullied or mistreated, though that happened to me (to a lesser extent than in my stories). This is also applicable to minorities, religious minorities, women and LGBTQ folks.

I feel ya. There never seems to be a shortage of reasons for people to pick on others; I do wish the world would go ahead and change already.

Let’s say your book is being turned into a feature length film; quick- cast the main two characters and pick a theme song or score.

That’s really more pertinent to one of my novels, though you could tease a film out of the “Tarot Queen, Melan” stories or “Legacy.” I think Curse of the Jenri would make a great film. Grace Jones was an image I had for Melan. I could really see Scarlett Johansen as Layla and someone like the Rock (though probably younger) playing Tander. But that’s the general attitude he’d need. I always thought the opening credits would be great to a remix of “Witchy Woman” as Layla sneaks into the castle.

Wikipedia

I love that opening credits description. Sounds like something I’d totally watch. I understand this question being more suitable to a novel, but what if you could cast a film based on this collection. Imagine something like the Heavy Metal movie (not suitable for children) where one entity connects all the unrelated stories together. Do you think that would be too much?

That’s a very intriguing thought. I don’t have a single thread holding them together, but don’t challenge me. I could come up with something and several stories could be grouped into a single episode.

Do you have any special plans for this book in the near or far future?

Well, I’m hoping to release it in paperback and ebook at the end of July or, at the latest, early August. My other anthologies (stories and poetry) are only available in ebook format (and they’re available for free) but I think this is something special. My friend (Chuck, I mentioned him) says this book is like an anthology of anthologies. I think it’s something special.

So, is this book available for pre-order?

Yes. You can find it at Amazon.com

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Okay readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors, that’s all for today. Be sure to follow this blog to see who will be visiting next time. To try other works by Stephanie Barr, please visit the links provided.

Amazon.com  |  Smashwords.com

Learn more about Stephanie Barr at the links below.

Facebook | Writing Blog

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Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

Bookreview: Firebound #fantasy #FlashbackFriday

This is a special post I do once a month to highlight a book I reviewed some time ago, but never actually featured on my blog. Because this is an author blog and not a book blog, I don’t always feature all the books I read. Like all good and dedicated fans of the written word, I do my part and leave reviews on Goodreads.com, Amazon.com, and sometimes other places, but don’t always bring attention to what I’m reading, unless you follow me on YouTube… hint, hint, wink wink 😉 In any case, please enjoy this review of a book I read at some point in my life.

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Today’s flashback review is a little special but mostly because today is International Authors Day. I’m featuring a review of a book from an author I really like.

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Goodreads

Title:  Firebound

Series: Spellbringers #2

Author: Tricia Drammeh

Genre: Urban Fantasy Romance, Paranormal

Pages: 285

Reading Level: Teen

Content: PG-13 (violence, sensuality, brief mild sexual content, dark and mature themes, adult situations, suspense)

In book one my heart went out to Bryce who seemed to be misunderstood, but in book 2 I really fell in love with Alisa. She’s the only character with no power of her own, yet she seems to be the strongest of them all. Depending on how you look at it, Alisa is the reason the Alexander family is as mighty as they are. In their society of magic and Spellbringers, their connection to this one human keeps them all from becoming monsters… I may be exaggerating a bit, but in any case, I really adore Alisa.

Rachel, on the other hand, is a character that despite her many many flaws, I can’t hate but don’t exactly love her. I feel for her in many ways, but she seems to be a bit self-destructive. Like all self-destructive people, she also hurts others as a result. The one thing she seems to have going for her is the fact that she is apparently the most powerful being on the planet though she hasn’t realized the extent of her powers. As destructive as she is, I still like her more than Jace.

It’s not that I don’t like Jace. I feel a bit indifferent about this character. I can see that he will continue to grow as the story develops, but for now, he’s a pretty face, decent brother, and good son.

The action of this book is much more involved, which I didn’t think was possible. Alisa and Bryce struggle to be close yet so far apart. After he speaks the claiming words to her, they crave each other but can’t share each other or live together. Alisa is forgetting what an independent person she used to be and Bryce is clinging to her affection so he won’t turn to the dark side. Yeah, whoa!

Rachel has the best of intentions trying to protect her brother but she has to know that going on dream dates with a demon isn’t going to end well. Plus, there’s more than one demon after her. When, Alisa, the only human in the bunch has to risk her life to save Rachel, things heat up in more ways than one. What a perfect end to this installment and a grand enticement for the next.

I think I enjoyed this one just as much as the first. Highly recommended again.

Read my review of Spellbound here.

I give this book a 5.

This review has been posted to GoodReads.

If you’d like to obtain a copy of this book, try this link: Amazon

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

The Cephalopod Coffeehouse #Review: Outliers of Speculative Fiction 2016 #specfic #book

The idea is simple: on the last Friday of each month, post about the best book you’ve finished over the past month while visiting other bloggers doing the same. In this way, we’ll all have the opportunity to share our thoughts with other enthusiastic readers. Please join us below.

Title: Outliers of Speculative Fiction 2016
Editor: L.A. Little
Author: Tim Jefferys, Various
Genre: Science Fiction, Anthology
Pages: 150
Reading Level: Adult
Content: R (adult situations and content, mature and dark themes, doom, and violence)

I was happy to see that another volume of this series was published. While it’s not as long as the first, it’s still top quality speculative fiction with lots of diversity.

Hell Is Other People: A.I. based on mood. Good.
The Death of Mohenjo Daro: cultural- epic battle of men, greed, and faith. Good
Myra’s Last Tango: end of the world and aliens with humor. Not bad.
Downriver at the End of the World: a sad, post-apocalyptic coming-of-age tale. Excellent.
A Speck in the Sky: dangerous power, sacrifice. Excellent.
The House on No Man’s Land: ghost story with a twist. Good.
Souls in Other Space: humorous, yet scary, space opera. Excellent.
Terrible Weight: sad and scary post-apocalyptic zombie-ish story. Excellent.
Existential Crisis: weird afterlife mingled with the living. Good.
A Packhorse for Your Silly Meme: A.I., evolution, an “infant savior”. Excellent.
Grand Ideas: not sure how to describe this one. Good.

Overall, I enjoyed this anthology and only wish there had been more of it. Recommended to adult (teens with parental approval) fans of science fiction, fantasy, paranormal, and horror.

I give this book a 5.

This review has been posted to GoodReads.

If you’d like to obtain a copy of this book, try this link: Amazon

Please stop by and see what others have read 😀

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

Bridges #WEPFF Challenge No. 5 featuring unknown title #amwriting #flashfiction

So, I’m on vacation and totally forgot to schedule this post. Also, I started working on it a few days ago and then forgot about it being too busy celebrating birthday month and working on a new blog project. This piece is unfinished and unpolished. My plan is to turn the segments into journal entries, but as you can see, I have a long way to go.

Well, all in all, I don’t think this is my worst work, but it shouldn’t be too bad. I look forward to seeing the other entries and thank Denise Covey and Yolanda Renée for yet, another, great challenge.

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Unknown Title

Figie’s all the time going on about things as if he knows what he’s saying, but everyone knows he just hears things and repeats’em. I guess this time around, Figie heard something that no one wanted him to go around repeat’n.

So, here we are, running for our lives. Well, he’s running for his life and I’m trying to help’em, but as soon as others realize I’m help’n em, I’ll too be on the run. Been traveling by night and hold’n up during the day. Too many folks round here so dependent on solar power that life pretty much comes to a standstill come night fall. Sure folks use lunar power a bit, but none bother much to go out when everything inside is all lit up like it’s still daytime.

I hoarded a bunch of portable recharging batteries a few years back in case I ever decided to leave town and do some adventure walk’n. Folks just don’t adventure walk like they used to. I member people laughing at me for wasting space on old tech that probably wouldn’t work, but who’s laugh’n now?

I’m pretty much doing everything on my own to keep me and Figie alive. He’s a complete wreck; shake’n and twitch’n all the time. Spect’n someone to come punch’n out of the dark and kill’em in his tracks. Crazy thing is, after explain’n the situation, Figie hasn’t said another word. I have no idea what he heard that’s got folks com’n after’em.

Soon well be reach’n Pillar Peak. I figure, we could hold up there for a good while. One way up, no way down, and too cold for most to live. With us charging our batteries during the day and keeping a fire going all the time, we should be able to get by.

Food shouldn’t be a problem wit the way the fowls dip and dive all around. Most times you can’t even see the exact point of Pillar Peak ‘cause of all the swarm’n fowl. Wit the collapsible dome we been using for shelter and my skills with a sling, we’ll be just fine for a while.

Well, it’s been a full Lunar since we bunkered at Pillar Peak and not a soul’s come look’n for us. I’m thinking maybe Figie’s done lost it. It was fun for a while. Got to go on that adventure walk I always been talk’n bout, but now what. Just catch’n fowl, keep’n the fire, and sleep’n. Tonight Figie’s gonna tell me what this is all about or I’m break’n camp and head’n back wit or wit out’em.

Holy walk’n spirits are we in a terrible mash. No one’s come look’n yet, but it’s only a matter of time. Stupid Figie, hang’n around gathering other folks knowledge instead of learn’n his own. What a fool. To think he once had me believe’n you didn’t need to bother wit read’n and learn’n if you just pay attention to other folk. “Other folk,” he’d say, “they’ll teach ya e’er thing ya need to know, if ya just listen and be patient.” So, what happens when you learn something you don’t want to know… I’ll tell ya. You run for your life.

Stupid Figie. Hanging around the High Lord Scholars, all the time trying to sound smarter than anybody would believe him to be, found out where the Bridge is. Heck, he found out that it’s actually real. I mean, no one goes looking for the Bridge no matter how much wonder and power might be instore, ‘cause no one actually thinks it’s real. But foo on me, it’s real and Figie knows where it is. And they know he knows.

Now I’m twitch’n day and night just like Figie. He’s at least come back to his senses a bit and his help’n out. We’re alternating sentry duties. I’m still hunting all the grub, but he’s cook’n it and clean’n up after. Don’t really matter. Our nerves are so on edge, every pound we put on, we shake off in nerves. We won’t make it to the frost season; not up here. We gonna have to leave, but that’ll probably get us caught and killed. Seems no matter what we do or don’t do, we’re head’n to the Endless Ferry.

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714 WIP- unkown title 2017 Copyright © Toinette J. Thomas
Seeking full critique.



Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords

#HeroLost & the #IWSG minds behind it; a #fantasy anthology.

The last, but certainly not least, stop on the tour. Let’s do this!

Hero Lost
Mysteries of Death and Life
An Insecure Writer’s Support Group
Anthology
Can a lost hero find redemption?

What if Death himself wanted to die? Can deliverance be found on a bloody battlefield? Could the gift of silvering become a prison for those who possessed it? Will an ancient warrior be forever the caretaker of a house of mystery?

Delving into the depths of the tortured hero, twelve authors explore the realms of fantasy in this enthralling and thought-provoking collection. Featuring the talents of Jen Chandler, L. Nahay, Renee Cheung, Roland Yeomans, Elizabeth Seckman, Olga Godim, Yvonne Ventresca, Ellen Jacobson, Sean McLachlan, Erika Beebe, Tyrean Martinson, and Sarah Foster.

Hand-picked by a panel of agents and authors, these twelve tales will take you into the heart of heroes who have fallen from grace. Join the journey and discover a hero’s redemption!

 

 

So, today, dear readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors, I have a special treat for you. I got a chance to ask some of the contributing authors some questions and even put them to a bit of a challenge. Please, enjoy!

1) What’s your name and a cool tag line?

Jen Chandler  – Artist, Author, Cat Herder (I really suck at tag lines…)

Ellen Jacobson – Purveyor of eccentric travel adventures on water and land.

Renee Cheung – a wanna be technomancer

Erika Beebe – a.k.a. “Cloud Nine Girl”

Sarah Foster Well, my blog says “The scribblings of a girl trying to become a real writer” (wait…am I a real writer now?)

Elizabeth Seckman – unrepentant daydreamer AKA writer

Olga Godim – My tagline would be “Fantasy and more”. That is what I write: fantasy and more.

Yvonne Ventresca – Because I primarily write young adult fiction, my tagline would be: Keeping teens turning the pages.

Tyrean Martinson – Writer, Daydreamer, Believer

I love these taglines. Each one gives a certain insight on the writer within the person.

2) What is the genre and title of your entry?

Jen: My story is a dark fantasy tale entitled, “The Mysteries of Death and Life”

Ellen: “The Silvering” is a fantasy story about a hero lost.

Renee: “Memoirs of a Forgotten Knight” – Fantasy, subgenre, technomancy

Erika: “The Wheat Witch.” Adult fantasy.

Sarah: “The Last Dragon” – a pretty straightforward fantasy, dragon skeletons and magic and such

Elizabeth: “Mind Body Soul” – Romantic Fantasy

Olga: “Captain Bulat” is a traditional fantasy story set in a quasi-medieval world.

Yvonne: “The Art of Remaining Bitter” (dystopian)

Tyrean: “Of Words and Swords” – high fantasy, humor, purposeful use of fantasy tropes

See now, I was worried that asking for the genre would be redundant considering it’s a fantasy anthology, but I’m glad I did it. I like discovering subgenres and important genre-blends within the overall genre. Thanks guys.

3) Without giving away your story, can you relay what Hero Lost means to you?

Jen: A Hero Lost is a lost soul, someone who, after a long time helping others, needs someone to come along, to be unafraid to confront them, and help them back to themselves.

Ellen: A Hero Lost initially struggles to do the right thing, but eventually finds the courage to stand up and fight for their principles.

Renee: For my entry, the theme of hero lost unfolds through the story someone who tried to do the right thing with unexpected and tragic consequences.

Erika: A “Hero Lost” is the lost soul mentality, the fall from your brightest and shiniest state in life, then something happens to knock you down to your knees.

Sarah: Someone who may have once been a hero, but for whatever reason has lost his way.

Elizabeth: Heroes make mistakes, too.

Olga: Exactly what the phrase says. A hero is lost. Nobody can find him. My protagonist is searching for him.

Yvonne: To me, “Hero Lost” means not having enough support and guidance to do the right thing.

Tyrean: A hero lost faces a dark night of the soul – a mid-life crisis or a world-changing expanse of horror.

Oh my, what a variety of responses; not one more fascinating than the other. I have a feeling this anthology will more than entertain people. It will help them in ways they didn’t know they needed.

4) Pick a song that represents or relates to the story you wrote?

Jen: Sarah McLaughlin’s “Building a Mystery” is the song that came to me when I started writing it and it stayed with me throughout the telling.

Ellen: Gorecki’s Symphony #3, also known as the Symphony of Sorrowful Songs.

Renee: “Dust in the Wind” by Kansas (The theme that all things fade away resonates strongly with my story.)

Erika: “Fortunate Son” by Credence Clearwater Revival

Sarah: “Smoke and Mirrors” by Imagine Dragons (The band’s name had no influence on my choosing, I swear.)

Elizabeth: “Heroes” by David Bowie

Yvonne: “Hey Jealousy” by the Gin Blossoms

Tyrean: “How You Remind Me” by Nickelback ran through my head repeatedly and I used one line of the chorus in the story.

Man, you guys are good. Finding inspiration in such different songs, yet they all are impactful on their own, and you all used them to write “lost hero” stories. My mind is a little blown.

5) Assuming that you do, ‘cause why wouldn’t you, tell me why you love the IWSG?

Jen: It’s nice to know that once a month, I have a group of people stopping by to share in my insecurities or who may need a little encouragement.

Ellen: It’s the people that make the IWSG so awesome. Their support and encouragement is phenomenal.

Renee: The IWSG is an awesome community with great information. It  has become an invaluable resource for a newbie like me.

Erika: IWSG is truly about people and caring. I’ve connected with so many amazing talented people I would have never met.

Sarah: It’s such a supportive group (it’s right in the name!) and there are always new people to meet.

Elizabeth: It’s cheaper than therapy.

Olga: Ha! IWSG has an in-built community of readers for my blog.  

Yvonne: Because it’s such a welcoming community, and it provides support and opportunities for writers.

Tyrean: I love the encouragement! Plus, I love the inspiration, helpful tips, and thought-provoking posts that deepen my writing.

I agree with you all. IWSG is so many things and all of them are positive. I count myself blessed to have stumbled upon it and made it part of my home on the web.

6) Think you all could collaborate once more? Add one sentence to this story chain.

Leaves fluttered in the greying sky like birds suddenly robbed of their flight. A sound, not unlike a gunshot, careened through the empty streets, sending a shock wave through the man standing alone in the park. He turned toward the noise, the leaves crunching beneath his feet as he nervously shifted his weight back and forth. His eyes darted back and forth, seeking the source even as dread crept up his back. They had caught up to him, he knew, deep in his bones, but he would face them with all the dignity he could muster. Two black shadowy figures materialized next to an old withered tree. They whispered to each other, too faint to hear. A wind careened between them, carrying to the man a smell and a single word. “Silence.” The word swept over him with a salty brine smell and he struggled to call up his power with his mind. The peace in that silence opened his mind to power of the nether world channeling strength to his body and clarity to his mind. He turned towards them, bowed his head briefly and then pulled a small, wooden box out of the pocket of his robe. He opened the box, reached for the weapon he so desperately needed. His fingers grasped at the wooden walls of the box, and he lifted his eyes, breathing a heavy sigh. At last he found the answer he’d been seeking, it wasn’t what he expected, not at all.

Oh snap yall! You guys just made me turn back to my southern roots. That was sooo good… And did you see how I snuck my own two cents in there at the begining? Dream come true. I wrote a story with the authors of the Hero Lost anthology. Yay! 😀

7) So, now, what are your overall thoughts on anthologies?

Jen: It’s fun to know that your story is nestled in a book with so many other works and that you are buffered by so much talent!

Ellen: It’s a fun way to explore a particular genre and discover new authors.

Renee: Anthologies are a great way to sample different authors and their writing styles. I own quite a few myself.

Erika: It was an amazing opportunity and I’m so happy I chose to get up and write something different.

Sarah: As a writer, I think it’s a great opportunity to get your voice out there and team up with other writers.

Elizabeth: Excellent way to read when you’re busy. I’m loving anthologies as much as snacks between meals.

Olga: They give many writers a voice, especially new writers. Besides, multiple writers make promotion easier.

Yvonne: Writing can be a lonely endeavor, but an anthology offers an instant mini-network of writers with a common bond.

Tyrean: I love them!

Here here. I’m loving anthologies too. As a reader, they offer the most variety and bang for your buck and fit into a busy lifestyle quite well. As a writer, they are great for networking, exposure, and learning from peers and teamwork.

Well, that’s all I have for today. Since I plan on stalking… I mean, following all of you, what’s your favorite social media platform? 

Jen: Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/jenchandlerwashere/

Ellen: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/TheCynicalSailor/

Renee: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/writerrenee

Erika: Twitter: https://twitter.com/cloudninegirl1

Sarah: Twitter https://twitter.com/Sarah_A_Foster

Elizabeth: I still enjoy my blog. www.eseckman.blogspot.com

Olga: Wattpad – https://www.wattpad.com/user/olga_godim

Yvonne: Twitter https://twitter.com/YvonneVentresca

Tyrean: Blog http://tyreanswritingspot.blogspot.com/

This has been a

 Be sure to check out any stops you missed. They’re great!

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. If you like it let me know and share it with others. See you next time, Toi Thomas. #thetoiboxofwords