The Wedding of Eithne by @MDellertDotCom – Interview by #thetoiboxofwords

Greetings readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors and welcome to The ToiBox of Words. I’m your host Toi Thomas, author of Eternal Curse, and today I’m sharing a special interview with author, Michael E.  Dellert, about his fiction book entitled, The Wedding of Eithne. Enjoy! 

Where did the idea for The Wedding of Eithne come from?

“The Wedding of Eithne” (and my books before it) have their origin in the first complete book that I ever wrote. In rewriting that book, I created a “Cuts” file as a place to dump a lot of back-story and exposition that was superfluous to that story. The “Cuts” file eventually came to some 191 pages of good story ideas in their own right. So in a sense The Wedding of Eithne is the last of a series of “prequels” to a book I’m still polishing for publication.

How did the title of this book come about?

For this book, I wanted a simple functional title that linked well with the last book in the series, since this was a continuation of that story from a new perspective.

I also wanted something that spoke to the particular story question: Will the Lady Eithne actually get married after everything that’s happened in the series to date, and what obstacles will come between her and the final decision to accept or reject the arranged marriage of the title?

What genre is this book and why did you choose to make it so?

“The Wedding of Eithne” is primarily a heroic fantasy novel, like the other works in my Matter of Manred series. The title heroine, Lady Eithne, is of relatively humble origin (being from the lowest rung of the aristocracy, and a bastard branch of her family besides), and has been reluctant for three books now to become an arranged bride, but she’s thrust into making this choice by events beyond her control. I wanted a smaller, intimate, character-driven story that explored questions of fate, free-will, pre-destination, family, and obligation, without the world-shaking overtones of epic fantasy.

What would you say is the overall message or the theme of this book?

I was raised Catholic, and have read a lot of “Chosen One” fantasy fiction over the years, and as a father of daughters, and a feminist-friendly person in general, the question of choice and free-will in relation to romance and religion is important me. So questions about fate, free-will, and the nature of evil feature prominently in the heroine’s development. It’s something of an “Abraham & Isaac” story, told from a female viewpoint, with marriage as the sacrificial altar. So these are the predominant themes in “The Wedding of Eithne.”

Tell me about the experience of writing this book; how long did it take.

Parts of “The Wedding of Eithne” go back fifteen years, and the original draft from which the core of this story emerged was written two years ago in about 90 days. And then this particular book was drafted last year in another 90-ish days, and went through about six months of rewrites before I was happy with the final draft. The process involved many years of researching medieval Irish culture, particularly marriage practices, myths, and legends. I even went to Ireland for a few weeks to immerse myself in the culture.

Tell me about the main storyline within this book.

The Lady Eithne has lived her whole life under a magical prohibition: she may not marry until the portents are favorable, but she’ll always have the right to choose her husband. Now, the portents are favorable, AND they coincide with an ancient prophecy. Eithne is left with little more than a day to decide whether to accept marriage arranged for her. But rival religious and political factions have their own ideas about her wedding plans. How can she avoid becoming a pawn for one side or another, yet still exercise her free right of choice?

Who is the protagonist of this story?

The Lady Eithne is the daughter of a minor aristocratic family, raised in a remote mountain village. Because of her magical prohibition, she aspired to a life beyond the typical fate of being married off as a teenager to the first man who could afford her bride-price. When the years went on, she began to think she’d end up an unmarried “spinster,” and learned about “men’s ways” in order to make an independent life for herself. Now that an arranged marriage has been contracted for her, she has to decide what love really means to her.

Who is the antagonist of this story?

This was actually an interesting problem in writing this novel. The visible antagonist is His Reverence Inloth, a priest who believes that his local religious institutions are corrupt and in need of reform, particularly its marriage practices. He is a native of the milieu, but studied abroad and returned with “foreign ideas” and a mission to make his countrymen “see the light” of the larger religious order. But there are also political opponents and “hidden” antagonists. Inloth’s reformation isn’t all that it seems to be, and not all of his villainous allies are honest and earnest.

What is the major conflict in this story?

As a divorced Catholic, I am myself something of an oxymoron, faced with the question of whether my marriage is actually still valid (no according to the State, but yes according to my Church). So the fundamental question in “The Wedding of Eithne” is whether Eithne really has the free-will to choose her own marriage partner, and what the consequences of that choice might be. She is also faced with the problem of whether her choice (if it is truly free) would be legitimate and valid, given the political and religious conflicts currently dividing her land.

Where and when is this story taking place?

“The Wedding of Eithne” is set in the dark, medieval-style milieu of my Matter of Manred fantasy series. The setting and political culture were influenced by 12th-Century AD Ireland in the decades preceding the Anglo-Norman Conquest, and the religious culture was inspired by hybridizing Irish myths and legends and mystic Pythagorean philosophy with real-life Catholic Church conflicts of the period. Robert E. Howard, Evangeline Walton, CJ Cherryh, and Glen Cook were the primary influences on the writing style, but I could probably spend 100 words just naming authors that have influenced me, there are so many.

Who is your favorite character in this book?

Although I love Lady Eithne and her betrothed, two minor characters who first appeared in my second book recur here: Adarc and Corentin. The first is essentially a fourteen-year-old seminary student, acting as a guide and interpreter for the second, a foreign merchant’s apprentice “studying the market” for his trading company. I love them because they have such divergent world-views, the spiritual versus the commercial. In a way, they represent the warring halves of my own soul, the writer (an act of faith) and the publisher (with all my American capitalist commercialism).

Are there elements of your personality or life experiences in this book?

I’ve already mentioned a few of the elements of my own life and personality that have wormed their way into “The Wedding of Eithne,” like my Irish Catholic upbringing, my divorce, and my daughters. I think any writer worth his salt tells very personal–and sometimes uncomfortable–stories. I’ve certainly taken my own fears of failure and success, and my reluctance to disappoint, and weaved these into the characters. I’ve also drawn on my own family history in developing these characters, though it wouldn’t be appropriate to name names, considering how much the characters have diverged from their inspirations.

What is one thing from this book you wish was real or could happen to you?

I suppose the whole book is an act of wish-fulfillment in one way or another. I wish I could find the sort of love that the characters in “The Wedding of Eithne” are looking for, a partner that isn’t just obligated to be a part of my life, as a consequence of chance and circumstance, but who really wants to be there. Someone I can believe in and encourage, and who believes in and supports the person I am and want to become as well.

What is something you wish wasn’t real and hope doesn’t happen to you?

I most certainly never want to be attacked by giant bats, spiders, or snakes!

Let’s say your book is being turned into a feature-length film; quick- cast the main two characters and pick a theme song or score.

Two songs come to mind: “When Will We Be Married” by the Waterboys and “Short-Change Hero by The Heavy. As for casting the film, I’ll have to say Keira Knightley from her roles in “King Arthur” and “Domino,” and F. Murray Abraham as the villain Inloth.

Do you have any special plans for this book in the near or far future?

This book closes out what I call “The Eowain Cycle” of my Matter of Manred Saga, setting up the background for the story in my next major book. But one thing I’d like to do with “The Wedding of Eithne” is create an omnibus edition that combines it with the previous three books in the series. I’d also like to create hardcover editions of my books. Several readers have already asked about it. Like many writers, I’m a total narcissist, so I wouldn’t mind having such a thing on my own shelves, something that will really last the ages.

Okay readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors, that’s all for today. Be sure to follow this blog to see who will be visiting next time. To Pre-order your copy of The Wedding of Eithne (March 28th release), please visit the links provided.

AMAZON | Author Direct links: EBOOK | signed PAPERBACK

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Coming Out Of Egypt by Angela Joseph Interview #Christian #Fiction

Greetings readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors and welcome to The ToiBox of Words. I’m your host Toi Thomas, author of Eternal Curse, and today I’m sharing a special interview with author, Angela Joseph, about her fiction book entitled, Coming Out Of Egypt. Enjoy!

Where did the idea for Coming Out of Egypt come from?

Many years ago when I was a teacher in Trinidad, there were rumors about two sisters who were being sexually abused by their father. Nothing was ever done about it, as far as I know. Fast forward to living in the US, I now work with women, as well as men, who have suffered this horrible fate and who continue to bear the emotional scars of their experience.

How did the title of this book come about?

Coming Out of Egypt is a metaphorical and literal title for the story that depicts the journey of two sisters, Marva and June, out of the bondage of an abusive past. It’s metaphorical because it is based on the exodus of the Israelites from the bondage of slavery. It’s also literal because after Marva, the older sister, commits a horrible crime as a result of that abuse, she and June flee their home in Egypt Village, Trinidad, in order to escape from the law.

What genre is this book and why did you choose to make it so?

Coming Out of Egypt belongs to the women’s fiction genre. While the story has a strong romantic element, the subject matter deals more with the journey of the main characters out of the bondage of their past experiences.

What would you say is the overall message or the theme of this book?

The theme of this book is one of redemption. My aim in writing this book is to bring hope and healing to women, and men, not just those who have been abused, but those who have been in bondage of some sort and feel they are no good and do not deserve to be loved. I want to show them they can “come out of Egypt” with God’s help.

Tell me about the experience of writing this book; how long did it take.

You may not believe this, but this book has been 13 years in the making. First, I could only write on weekends because I worked full time, then I attended a writers’ conference where an editor told me I had too much material in one book. She suggested I make the teacher in the story the protagonist and focus on the romance between her and the detective. This I did, but then I couldn’t get an agent and my writer’s group felt it didn’t have the punch the first book had. Back I went to the keyboard and came up with not two, but three books. My research focused on the effects of sexual abuse on women and their partners.

Tell me about the main storyline within this book.

After accidentally killing her father and dumping his body in a nearby river, seventeen-year-old Marva and her younger sister June flee their home in Egypt Village, Trinidad. Marva ’s goal  is  to forge a new life for herself and June and forget the memories of their abusive past. But, desperate to elude the ruthless detective, control her rebellious sister, and hold down a job in a man’s domain, Marva’s new life is not what she envisioned.  While she yearns for love, understanding and forgiveness, Marva knows she deserves only punishment. Will she get what she yearns for or what she deserves?

Who is the protagonist of this story?

Seventeen-year-old Marva is the protagonist of the story. She is  taciturn, strict with few friends, desperately longing for love, but afraid of men in general – although she does harbor some romantic feelings for her childhood friend. She is fiercely devoted to her younger sister June and is not afraid of getting into a fight to protect her.

Thirteen-year-old June is almost the opposite of her sister. Even though she too was abused by her father, she craves the attention of the opposite sex and uses her beauty to win them over. She loves her sister, but tries to wriggle out of her control.

Who is the antagonist of this story?

The antagonist is David, the detective, who is investigating the murder of the girls’ father. Even though he is not a bad guy, he thinks Marva is guilty and is anxious to carry out his duties. She sees him as her archenemy and tries to avoid him at all costs.

What is the major conflict in this story?

The major conflict centers on Marva’s attempts to elude the detective who, she knows, suspects her of murdering her father. She moves to another city where she thinks she will be safe, only to discover that not only does her former teacher, who has always shown an interest in her, now lives in that city, but she is engaged to the detective. As circumstances conspire to bring Marva and June into closer contact with the teacher, Marva wishes she could confide in her, but she is scared, not so much of being brought to justice, but of what might happen to her sister.

Where and when is this story taking place?

The story takes place in Trinidad in the mid-80s. The country, which lies at the northern tip of Venezuela, formerly a British colony, is now a republic, rich in oil, natural gas, and asphalt. The population consists mainly of people of African and East Indian descent with a smaller percentage comprising of Europeans, Chinese, Hispanics, and people from the middle east. The two main characters are of Venezuelan descent.  The story makes lavish references to the diverse cultural influences of this fun-loving nation.

Who is your favorite character in this book?

Apart from Marva, the protagonist, my favorite character is Cicely, the school teacher, who plays a great role in helping Marva overcome a lot of her weaknesses and become a child of God. Cicely is kind, warm-hearted and generous. She was also molested by her father as a young girl and was, therefore, able to empathize with Marva and give her the love and support she so much needed.

Are there elements of your personality or life experiences in this book?

Quite a few of my life experiences were brought to bear in writing this book. As I mentioned before, I was a teacher in the same school that I write about in the story and knew two sisters who, it was rumored about, were being molested by their father, but they were never my pupils. Also, I work with patients in behavioral health who have been sexually abused. As far as personality, I think I am somewhat like Cicely.

~

Okay readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors, that’s all for today. Be sure to follow this blog to see who will be visiting next time. To obtain your copy of Coming Out of Egypt, please visit the link provided. Amazon.com

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Fang and Claw by Markie Madden @naddya81975 Interview by #thetoiboxofwords #paranormal #crime

Greetings readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors and welcome to The ToiBox of Words. I’m your host Toi Thomas, author of Eternal Curse, and today I’m sharing a special interview with author, Markie Madden, about her fiction book entitled, Fang and Claw. Enjoy!

Where did the idea for Fang and Claw (Undead Unit Book 1) come from?

I was just in that twilight moment between wakefulness and sleep when the idea for the book (and the whole series) came to me. I was watching a Supernatural DVD marathon that night. I had just about gotten fully asleep (difficult enough for me as I’m a chronic insomniac) when suddenly I was wide awake and grabbing for my phone. To use as a light. While I struggled to make notes on a Post-It note. Without my glasses on. LOL

How did the title of this book come about?

No one’s asked me this yet! The title is a spin off of the phrase “fighting tooth and nail”, because my two main characters who are a Vampire and a Werewolf start out hating each other’s guts. Hence, “fighting fang and claw”!

What genre is this book and why did you choose to make it so?

This book is obviously in the crime genre but it fits into paranormal as well. Or supernatural, if you like that better. I think it will appeal to people who like either crime, paranormal, or both. Or just about anyone.

What would you say is the overall message or the theme of this book?

I’ve begun this series with Immortals, various species who are known and accepted by humans. Accepted as much as any minority is, anyway. The Immortals are required to take the Undead Oath which prevents them from harming humans. But they still suffer the same prejudice that many minorities faced, or still face, in society today. I’ve tried to make them as “normal” as I could, in a literary attempt to point out to readers that we’re all “normal”.

Tell me about the experience of writing this book; how long did it take.

I’ve been working on this book for probably 6 or 8 months now, maybe a little more. I’ve slept since then so you have to pardon my memory. Much of law enforcement techniques I didn’t need to research (I spent nearly 14 years of my life working in law enforcement positions), but there were certain elements which I had to look up since I wasn’t familiar with them. At one point I set myself the goal of writing 3,000 words a day and that worked really well.

Tell me about the main storyline within this book.

Lacey is a lieutenant with the Dallas Police, just put in charge of a new unit of Immortals (or Undead) dedicated to solving crimes among other Immortals. She’s a Vampire with a past; her entire family was massacred by a Werewolf pack. Colton is a detective, and he’s been assigned as her partner and second in command. He’s a Wolf, a descendant of the pack that killed Lacey’s family. They have to learn to overcome their prejudices and solve a case that spans decades.

Who is the protagonist of this story?

Both Lacey and Colton would be the main ones. They’re the “good guys”, the ones who are investigating and solving the crime, they protect and serve. Lacey likes fast cars and expensive luxuries. Colton and his wife and 5 pups live in an apartment in a building full of other Werewolves. These two couldn’t be more different from one another. But they both have a strong sense of justice and are tough as nails against those who commit crimes.

Who is the antagonist of this story?

I can’t tell you what species of Immortal he is (spoiler), but he’s based on actual Native American lore and he is just generally nasty and likes to cause trouble. He’s your typical “bad guy”, one who enjoys being bad. He’s responsible for several assaults that span a couple decades, and he’s been just sly enough not to get caught. Until now.

What is the major conflict in this story?

Besides having the mystery to solve, Lacey and Colton have to come to terms with the fact that they’re being partnered together. Lacey is unaware at the beginning that Colton is related to the pack that killed her family. Once this truth comes out, it becomes very difficult for them to work together. They have to learn how to be partners and trust one another with their lives.

Where and when is this story taking place?

This takes place in Dallas, Texas, a little over a hundred years from now. Not so far into the future that things and cities would be unrecognizable to a reader, but enough where I can take just a few liberties.

Who is your favorite character in this book?

Lacey has got to be my favorite. She’s a no-nonsense kind of gal who doesn’t take any s*** off anyone. She’s a little like me: I mentioned I have a law enforcement background. When you’re a woman in a predominately male profession, especially one fraught with danger, you learn how to be a hard butt because that adds a level of protection for you. I got so good at projecting a fierce face that I never had to lay hands on anyone in my 14 years.

Are there elements of your personality or life experiences in this book?

As mentioned above, I have a bit of experience in law enforcement, which also includes some private investigation. While I was never a police officer, I dealt with them regularly and did personal protection details, among other things. So some of that experience has come in handy in writing this book.

What is one thing from this book you wish was real or could happen to you?

I wish I drove the car that Lacey has. It’s an Audi S4 (I have an older model A6 sedan, but the S4 is just plain awesome!) and is the epitome of luxury!

What is something you wish wasn’t real and hope doesn’t happen to you?

Um, I’d tell you but it would be a spoiler. Let me just say that I’m afraid of heights and leave it at that.

Let’s say your book is being turned into a feature-length film; quick- cast the main two characters and pick a theme song or score.

For Lacey, Angelina Jolie hands-down (I liked her as a blond in Salt). Colton is a little harder, because I’d love to cast Sean Connery (maybe when he was younger.) Barring him, I’d have to say Jared Padalecki (assuming he could be tough-he’s already got awkward down pat!)

Do you have any special plans for this book in the near or far future?

I’m already hard at work on the sequel, book 2 of the Undead Unit. It’s called Souls of the Reaper and will be released (I hope) early next year. Plus I’ve got books 3, 4, 5, and 6 in the planning stages. I’m really excited about them too!

~

Okay readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors, that’s all for today. Be sure to follow this blog to see who will be visiting next time. To obtain your copy of Fang and Claw, please visit the link provided.

Metamorph Publishing
(Available at Amazon.com & other online retailers)

Also, check out Markie’s Facebook Event for
fun games and prizes related to this release.

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August’s Gardens by @Shelly_Barclay Virtual Book Tour Interview by #thetoiboxofwords via @RABTBookTours #horror


Greetings readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors and welcome to The ToiBox of Words. I’m your host Toi Thomas, author of Eternal Curse, and today I’m sharing a special interview with author, Michelle Barclay, about her fiction book entitled, August’s Gardens. Enjoy!

Amazon.com

Where did the idea for August’s Gardens come from?

The idea for August’s Gardens came from its predecessor, Morrigan’s Shadows. The story just kept on going, so I kept on writing it.

How did the title of this book come about?

August’s Gardens derives from the name of one of the characters and a running theme in the novel. I wanted to shift the focus of the story to this character, even though it is truly a cast of characters.

What genre is this book and why did you choose to make it so?

August’s Gardens is a fantasy horror novel. I just wrote a book with hopefully scary bits in it. The fantasy part came about because the story needed some fantastic elements. Horror is a lot of fun to write, but so is fantasy.

What would you say is the overall message or the theme of this book?

August’s Gardens isn’t quite literary fiction. There is no underlying message about the human condition or anything like that. If anything, I just hope I gross people out or give them a chill here or there.

Tell me about the experience of writing this book; how long did it take.

August’s Gardens took several years, but only because I set it aside for one of them so I could get married. I started writing it a few months after Morrigan’s Shadows came out. There was some research involved in injuries and characters, but the nature of the book makes it easy to wing it without too much study. I would have to give away a sort of tongue-in-cheek aspect of the story to say too much about research. Hopefully, people will pick up on it.

Tell me about the main storyline within this book.

August’s Gardens is the continuation of the plot in Morrigan’s Shadows. However, it primarily takes place in a fantasy world with some seriously bad creatures hanging out in it. This world was glimpsed only briefly in Morrigan’s Shadows.

Who is the protagonist of this story?

There are actually several protagonists in August’s Gardens. The Winged Man is back. The Artist plays a much larger role and there are some hopefully unexpected additions to that list.

Who is the antagonist of this story?

The antagonist is without a doubt the Dark Man, an amalgamation of all the devil figures in lore. He is the source behind the bulk of the conflict and an enemy of even the protagonist’s enemies, which might tell you something about who fights on which side when it comes down to it.

What is the major conflict in this story?

It is time for the conflict between the Dark Man and the god-like protagonists of the story to erupt. The Dark Man hates everyone, but mostly the Winged Man. The Winged Man is rightly angry over everything the Dark Man has done to his family, namely his wife. They have yet to come face to face and it is time.

Where and when is this story taking place?

August’s Gardens mostly takes place in the Dream and Dark Realms, fantastic worlds where a set of brothers control dreams and an evil creature lords over the dead. A portion of the story takes place in turn of the century France where the Artist’s backstory is revealed.

Who is your favorite character in this book?

The Artist is without a doubt my favorite character in this book. He is the most redeemable and respectable. Most of my other characters are a blend of good and bad. The Artist is the only one who resists the evil that surrounds him and works only for the betterment of the people he loves.

Are there elements of your personality or life experiences in this book?

There is nothing in August’s Gardens that exists in any way in my life. That would be very strange. However, the series itself has some elements from my life. I have really vivid dreams and nightmares. That prompted me to write about dreams and nightmares. I was a cook for nearly a decade. Morrigan owned a restaurant.

~

Okay readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors, that’s all for today. Be sure to follow this blog to see who will be visiting next time. To obtain your copy of August’s Gardens, please visit the links provided.

Amazon  | Barnes & Noble  | Kobo  | CreateSpace

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Whispers from the East by @amietheauthor Virtual Book Tour Interview by #thetoiboxofwords via @RABTBookTours #historicalnovel

Greetings readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors and welcome to The ToiBox of Words. I’m your host Toi Thomas, author of Eternal Curse, and today I’m sharing a special interview with author, Amie Ali, about her fiction book entitled, Whispers from the East. Enjoy!

Amazon

Where did the idea for Whispers from the East come from?

I am a part of a support group for Western women who are born to non-Western born Muslim men. The stories I hear from the women who pass through and my friends who have committed to the group are amazing. Some are wonderful, some are terrible, and some are just like any other relationship that doesn’t cross cultural and religious barriers. I felt like these stories needed to be heard. None of the characters are based on any one person or experience. I think every woman I have spoken with that is in this type of relationship will see a bit of herself in all the characters.

How did the title of this book come about?

The title was the result of a huge amount of brainstorming. Plays on words and phrases that are catchy and memorable, in the hope it might entice a reader to look closer. Whispers from the East was a title that I was excited about the moment it was presented to me. This is the story of three women with ties to South Asia, a land they have been drawn to through their experiences and love lives. One was born there, and two were gently coaxed. There were no loud sirens or declarations to the East…just the whispers of their hearts.

What genre is this book and why did you choose to make it so?

The book is Literary Fiction under the sub-genres of Historical Fiction and Women’s Fiction. I didn’t choose the genres, the genres chose me!

What would you say is the overall message or the theme of this book?

The overall message is that there are many, many different kinds of love. It doesn’t fit into a box. People have different expectations on what a relationship and a marriage should be like, and no matter where you are in the world, ultimately we are all looking for love.

Tell me about the experience of writing this book; how long did it take.

I’ve actually only been asked this once before and even I find the answer to be quite shocking. I wrote Whispers from the East in under 90 days. Once I started, it just poured out of my soul.

Who is the protagonist of this story?

There are three women in this book who all share the role of protagonist, and they are Ammi, Carolyn, and Ivy. Ammi is the Pakistani mother of three sons, two of whom immigrate to America and eventually marry Carolyn and Ivy. The story is told from the point of view of each woman.

Who is the antagonist of this story?

The antagonists are misconception and miscommunication. All of the protagonists have their own internal battles to fight, and their inner struggles are the only antagonists in Whispers from the East. And those demons are fierce!

Where and when is this story taking place?

There are three distinctive time settings and three locations the stories take place. Ammi is a migrant in the 1947 Partition of India, so we see her move during that time from New Delhi, India to Lahore, Pakistan, where she raises her family. We then meet Carolyn in the 1970’s San Francisco Bay, followed by Ivy, in 1980’s Florida.

Who is your favorite character in this book?

Ammi is central in the story and, as their mother-in-law, in the lives of Carolyn and Ivy. She’s definitely the one who pulls at my heart strings the most.

Are there elements of your personality or life experiences in this book?

You know, it’s almost impossible to not have bits of yourself in what you write. Where Amie Ali is in Whispers from the East is in the scenery. I have traveled pretty extensively and that tends to translate onto the pages. It would be hard to write about a place I have never experienced first hand, but thankfully, I don’t have to!

What is one thing from this book you wish was real or could happen to you?

I wish I could buy canned chickpeas instead of uncooked, but my husband wouldn’t go for that!

Let’s say your book is being turned into a feature length film; quick- cast the main two characters and pick a theme song or score.

I have THREE main characters and I’d give them to: Mahira Khan (young Ammi), Amanda Seyfried (Carolyn), and Anna Kendrick (Ivy).

As for the score, I’d have to leave that in the expert hands of Hans Zimmer.

Do you have any special plans for this book in the near or far future?

While Whispers from the East is a stand alone and not the start of a series, I do have a tie-in to follow it that will be out next year. Exciting!

~

Okay readers, bloggers, geeks, and authors, that’s all for today. Be sure to follow this blog to see who will be visiting next time. To obtain your copy of Whispers from the East, a Reader’s Favorite, please visit the links provided.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

ReadersFavorite.com

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